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17th November 2015

Mandara Cromwell, President of ISTA and CEO of Cyma Technologies Inc., presented John Stuart Reid with an award for his contribution to cymatics

The International Sound Therapy Association (ISTA) based in Atlanta, USA, honored’s team leader, John Stuart Reid, for his contribution to cymatics during the Cymatics Conference, November 7th, 2015.

Presentation of the award followed a talk given by Reid titled "Sound Healing at the Cellular Level”, during which he discussed the mechanisms that may underpin sound’s ability to trigger the body’s healing response. Reid recounted that almost 20-years ago he had had what seemed like a miraculous healing of his lower back during a cymatics experiment he carried out in Egypt’s Great Pyramid. Since then he has researched the question of how sound supports healing and has developed a hypothesis involving cymatic patterns that he conjectures appear on the surface membranes of the body’s cells, thus stimulating the Integral Membrane Proteins that project from cell membranes. To support this conjecture he showed a video in which cymatic ‘train’ patterns are made visible on a cell membrane of the Aloe Vera plant, possibly the first time that such patterns have been captured. In future work he will attempt to capture cymatic patterns on the membranes of human cells.

Reid also showed a video in which three of the sounds from Cyma Technologies’ AMI 1000 sound therapy unit were made visible with the CymaScope instrument. He commented, “I use sound therapy whenever I have an ailment. The three sounds I made visible and showed to delegates at the Cymatics Conference were some of those I used recently to support healing of two ailments. Both maladies were helped within only three sessions, reinforcing what I learned accidentally in the Great Pyramid almost 20-years ago, which is that sound, when properly administered, has powerful healing properties."

Mandara Cromwell said, “It is my great pleasure to honor John Stuart Reid with this award for his contributions to the field of Cymatics. Over the past 10 years John has conducted research and collaborated with many in the fields of science, and the visual and healing arts. Projects with his invention, the CymaScope, include making the sound of our Sun visible, which became part of an exhibit at the prestigious Smithsonian museum. Effects of his work have far reaching benefits for many. John, on behalf of the International Sound Therapy Association and Cyma Technologies it is my privilege to present this award for your extraordinary efforts and contributions to our Cymatic World!





Mandara Cromwell, president of The International Sound Therapy Association,
presenting an award to John Stuart Rei

A cymatic pattern train imaged on the cell membrane of the Aloe Vera plant
imaged with a sub miniature CymaScope



26th October 2015

Dr. Kenneth John Atchity visits the CymaScope Laboratory

The true shape and power of sound to feature in a forthcoming animated film.

Dr. Atchity is an American film producer and author who has worked in the world of letters as a literary manager and as a professor of comparative literature. He was labeled a "story merchant” by a visiting ambassador to the United States. Atchity commented, "I believe in the power of stories to change the world. I’ve been privileged to spend a lifetime helping storytellers project their stories to the widest audiences in book and film.”

The latest franchise he is managing is Dr. Fuddle and the Gold Baton, a young person’s novel (now available) and forthcoming live action animated film in which the forces of good-versus-evil (cacophony versus euphony) play out through the transformational power of classical music. The concept was created by Dr. Warren L. Woodruff, musicologist and head of the Woodruff School of Arts in Roswell, Georgia. During Dr. Atchity's visit the creation of the Gold Baton app was discussed, based on the concepts used in the CymaScope Music Made Visible App, in addition to ideas for representing music in the film within a visual context. Atchity said,
" Because of the CymaScope instrument, the forthcoming Gold Baton App and finale of the film will introduce to the world the true shape and transformative power of sound.”




Dr Kenneth John Atchity in the CymaScope laboratory

Dr. Fuddle and the Gold Baton--by Warren L. Woodruff



10th September 2015

Children living with cancer: CymaScope Art Therapy project

When Portland artist, Kyle Thomas, decided to create an art therapy project for the Pediatric Cancer Foundation’s “Camp Smile”, he contacted the CymaScope team. Kyle explained, "Camp Smile is a community-supported annual event based in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania. My initial idea was to capture the children’s voice patterns and print hard copies in monochrome for each child to color. This would highlight that they are unique spirits and that even while battling an illness they have the ability to express themselves freely."

He discussed the concept with John Stuart Reid who was immediately enthusiastic about it. The discussion sparked in Kyle the idea to place the children in three groups and sing the words, “Love", “Expression", “Art". He arranged the words as a formula that the children could easily remember:

Love + Expression = Art

The three group songs were recorded and sent to the CymaScope laboratory for imaging. John Stuart Reid imaged one word from each group; from one recording he imaged the word “Love”, from the next he imaged, “Expression” and from the third he imaged the word “Art”.

Kyle said, "When the kids saw the three Voice Mandalas the beauty of the patterns had a profound impact on them. They were truly in awe of what they created with their own voices. For several of the kids there was a very real connection to the sound art they created." Each child was given a copy of their group Voice Mandala to take home and paint for fun, creating a pretty keepsake of their experience. Some children decided to donate their art to the Foundation’s yearly Gala so it can be valued at auction to raise funds for next year’s Camp Smile.

For Michelle Zenie and Lisa Kappes of the Pediatric Cancer Foundation this annual event opens an opportunity for children and their families to step outside the daily life of therapies and treatments and instead, play and have fun. Michelle commented, "An environment is created that allows them to feel and be free, as children are meant to be.” Lisa added, "The bonds that are formed among the children are significant, and quite different to the way that unchallenged children respond to each other. This is what makes Camp Smile such a special place and event."

If you or someone you know would like to support the efforts of Camp Smile and their Foundation, donations can be made via the Foundation’s web site:

Kyle Thomas can be found on Instragram @Kyle_Cre8s



From right to left: Artist, Kyle Thomas with students, Jack Knudson and Evan Luzader.

The dog is Machi (In service to Jack)


4th August 2015

The CymaScope is featured in Adam B Dorfman’s Conceptual Revolutions in Science

Adam B Dorfman’s Conceptual Revolutions in Science, published in July 2015 by Relentlessly Creative books, features John Stuart Reid and the CymaScope, in addition to the pioneering work of Dr. Gerald H. Pollack, MJ Pangman, Daniel Schmidt, and Dr. Mae-Wan Ho. It is essential reading for those searching for a higher truth and a desire to gain vital insights into the complex jigsaw that is modern science.

John Stuart Reid commented, “I was honoured to be asked to contribute to Conceptual Revolutions in Science, a book that provides a powerful exploration of science and contains many gems of knowledge to help seekers everywhere; gems that have already helped me. The twin spiral cover image of the book was created on the CymaScope instrument and, in one sense, is an image that embodies the core essence of my exploration into the realm of sound: to attempt to discover the link between sound and life, and answer the question, was sound a key ingredient in the creation of life?

Twin spirals are created in Nature by a natural phyllotaxis principle that embodies Fibonacci mathematical relationships and yet, since twin spirals can be readily created by sound, it raises the intriguing possibility that sound is not only an aspect of life, but, perhaps, life is an aspect of sound." Curiosity is something that drives Adam B. Dorfman, and he designed Conceptual Revolutions in Science to help readers explore new findings in a fast-paced format, and stretch their view of reality. He commented, “I hope that my book will have a profound impact on the lives of readers since it provides a modern scientific framework from which to observe the world and offers encouragement and knowledge to pursue the most amazing innovations in our global industries.”

Conceptual Revolutions in Science can be obtained from Amazon:

Adam B. Dorfman’s web site can be found at:




Adam B. Dorfman


18th July 2015

Dr. Rupert Sheldrake visits the CymaScope Laboratory

Dr. Rupert Sheldrake, one of the world’s most well-known and celebrated scientists, recently visited the CymaScope laboratory and talked with John Stuart Reid.

Dr. Sheldrake obtained his PhD in biochemistry from Clare College, Cambridge, for his work in plant development and plant hormones and went on to become a fellow of Clare College, working in biochemistry and cell biology and publishing a number of papers on this subject. A 2012 profile published in The Guardian newspaper described him as "one of the brightest Darwinians of his generation”. His 1970’s research with Philip Rubery of the chemiostatic model concerning the auxin transport within plants, has been confirmed in recent years by other researchers. Auxin is a hormone with morphogen-like characteristics and involved in the morphology mechanism of plants. (One of the first people to discuss morphogenesis was Alan Turing in his paper, The Chemical Basis of Morphogenesis in which he predicted a chemical mechanism for biological pattern formation.) Dr. Sheldrake says he ended this line of research, concluding that, "After nine years of intensive study, it became clear to me that biochemistry would not solve the problem of why things have the basic shape they do.”

John Stuart Reid shares an interest with Dr. Sheldrake in the morphology of plants and animals. The CymaScope often creates cymatic forms that strongly resemble early lifeforms, suggesting that there may be a link between the sonic environment and the morphology of early life. Reid commented, “When I first began to see life-like cymatic forms emerge in water (contained in the CymaScope’s visualising cell) my initial thought was that the forms were likely to be happenstance, but over the years I have witnessed more and more of these sonic forms emerge, created by sound alone, and I can no longer dismiss them as coincidentally resembling early organisms; it now seems to me almost certain that a governing sonic mechanism was at work in Earth’s primordial oceans .”

During Dr. Sheldrake’s visit the CymaScope Pro instrument was demonstrated and he commented, “This new analogue method of rendering sounds visible is fascinating and carries potential to open new horizons in many fields of science”.




Dr. Rupert Sheldrake and John Stuart Reid


7th June 2015

CymaScope Video in a World-first Cathedral Installation

When Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, in Portland, Oregon, decided to sponsor an art installation they chose a collaborative design by artist, Shelley Socolofsky and John Stuart Reid of The theme set by the cathedral was that the piece should connect light and dark and be a "new and experimental art form and media that cannot be hung on walls nor placed on pedestals”.

Using this brief Socolofsky and Reid came up with a design titled ''Cauldron", featuring a six foot diameter circular pond of white color-dyed water, onto which a video projector would fire CymaScope imagery relevant to the cathedral. It was decided to make visible the beautiful Pilgrim's Hymn, sung by the cathedral's choir, and for a finale, to make visible part of JS Bach's Toccata and Fugue. Socolofsky designed a warm color pallet for the CymaScope imagery and asked for the piece to begin with the sound of flowing water made visible, followed by the sound of the Trinity Bell made visible. The bell sound was recorded at St Paul's Episcopal Church in Salem, Oregon- struck by their music director Paul Klemme.

After the installation opened to the public Shelley Socolofsky commented, ''The Cauldron installation was a huge success and the crowd was mesmerised and fascinated by the CymaScope imagery reflected off water. People came to see it in their droves.'' Nathan LaDuc, Acting Dean of the Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, said, ''Cauldron [which ran May 15th to May 31st 2015] allowed us to see our beloved cathedral in new ways with sound, color, light and water a centrepiece of our arts festival [that] gave us a fresh yet ancient perspective on the meaning of sacred space. It was an amazing installation; I'm still hearing people talk about it! Thanks [to Shelley Socolofsky and the CymaScope team and thanks to Allan Oliver [of the cathedral's arts committee] for making it all happen!''

John Stuart Reid commented, ''The Trinity art installation project represents the first ever cymatics-based art installation in a cathedral, to our knowledge. It was a real thrill to see the imagery of the marvellous Pilgrim's Hymn and Toccata and Fugue come alive for the first time in the CymaScope laboratory. James Stuart Reid did wonderful work in constructing and editing the various elements in post production. We hope this will be the first of many MusicMadeVisible videos designed for sacred spaces in the future.''

John Stuart Reid commented, ''The Trinity art installation project represents the first ever cymatics-based art installation in a cathedral, to our knowledge. It was a real thrill to see the imagery of the marvellous Pilgrim's Hymn and Toccata and Fugue come alive for the first time in the CymaScope laboratory. James Stuart Reid did wonderful work in constructing and editing the various elements in post production, aided by Stuart Mitchell who provided the musical score for the two pieces of music. We hope this will be the first of many MusicMadeVisible videos designed for sacred spaces in the future.''




31st March 2015

Pictures From an Unseen World:

CymaScope Images featured in San Francisco 'Window Gallery'

A collection of CymaScope images were featured in San Francisco's Window Gallery at the Center for New Music during March 2015. The centrepiece of the exhibition was the Mereon Matrix image, given prominence as the most important in the show. The CymaScope team is working with scientists who have been studying the Mereon pattern for almost two decades and they believe it may prove to be the creative principle at the heart of Nature.

John Stuart Reid commented, ''We were delighted to have been invited to exhibit in San Francisco's Window Gallery. CymaScope imagery, as art, is a wonderful way to introduce the concept of visible sound to the general public and we are particularly pleased to have displayed the Mereon prime frequency image which is helping provide scientists with new insights into physics."

David Samas, curator of The Gallery for Invented Instruments within the Window Gallery, commented, ''I very much respect the CymaScope team and relate to the imagery both as art and science. CymaScope images are all so wonderful it was hard to decide which to show in our gallery but our final choice proved popular and everyone who saw the pieces loved them."





1st November 2014

Canadian Professors visit the CymaScope Laboratory

Professors Lila Pine (New Media) and Joanne DiNova (sociolinguistics) from Ryerson University, Canada, visited the CymaScope laboratory to explore the possibilities of using the instrument for language studies.

In recent years cymascopic techniques have advanced to the point where it is now possible to make almost any sound visible by transcribing sonic periodicities to water wavelet periodicities, techniques that permit even the most subtle nuances within speech, for example, to be rendered visible. The challenge facing scientists wishing to utilise the CymaScope instrument to explore aspects of sound generated by organic or inorganic processes, is in developing methods capable of analyzing the resulting imagery. The Geometry section of the CymaScope web site discusses research in this area and highlights recent achievements:

Dr Lila Pine and DiNova had previously developed a digital spectrographic instrument to compare and study patterns within languages, but they hoped that the CymaScope could provide visual markers that would help identify key patterns within different languages. They are particularly interested in the languages of First Nation people of North America in which they are beginning to identify elements not seen in the English language.

First Nation languages are at risk due to the impacts of colonisation. Professor DiNova commented, '' was immediately intrigued by the CymaScope images I had seen online. But when I actually saw it in action, saw the water physically move to form complex patterns in real time, I knew right away that this was the tool for our research.'' Professor Pine added, ''And because our scholarship is Indigenous in nature, water is the perfect imaging medium."



Dr Lila Pine and DiNova with John Stuart Reid in the CymaScope laboratory



12 September 2014

Holographic Modelling Techniques applied to CymaScope imagery by Digital Artist and Musician, John McGowan

The holographic nature of sound was postulated several years ago by John Stuart Reid; it assumes that every atomic particle of air carries all the data that describes a particular sound. The holographic concept for sound found recent support with esteemed acoustician, Andrew Munro, who visited the CymaScope laboratory in July 2015. Now the principles of holographic sound have been used by Digital Artist and Musician, John McGowan, who applied VFX modelling techniques to a MusicMadeVisible (MMV) video that he commissioned. MMV is an experimental medium being developed by the CymaScope team in which a physical analog is created by imprinting music's vibrations onto a water membrane in the CymaScope's vizualising cell.

The music used for this experiment was Mr McGowan's own composition titled ''Stretch''. He commented, ''I was inspired by the CymaScope's ability to render music visible in quasi-3D and for my Master of Science project I had the idea that if I could model quasi-3D imagery into full 3D, the technique could enlighten and educate, providing a visual tool to help show the true nature of sound. I used VFX techniques including particle dynamics, texturing and modelling methods. I analysed and modelled the individual frames from the MusicMadeVisible video, interpreting the shapes using Maya Nurbs modelling techniques (Autodesk Maya 3D Software). Colours and ''wave like'' effects were added to the particles by using scripted mathematical expressions in Maya, as well as having a separate translucent layer of the geometry with a 'soap bubble material applied. Finally, the many layers were assembled in Nuke compositing software.

The project took around 4 months to complete. John Stuart Reid commented, ''John McGowan's achievement is highly significant and has provided not only a launch pad from which a new audio-visual entertainment medium could emerge but also a technique to diffuse knowledge concerning the spherical nature of sound in a new and powerfully visual way. It also carries the potential to help advance scientific understanding of the nature of holographic sound.''

The video, titled 'Holographic Music,' can be viewed on YouTube, here:

John McGowan's web pages can be found here:

The original MMV track prepared by John Stuart Reid and James Stuart Reid can be viewed on the CymaScope YouTube channel, here:




The video, titled 'Holographic Music,' can be viewed on YouTube, here:



24st July 2014

Acoustics Consultant, Andrew Munro, visits the CymaScope laboratory

Andrew Munro, is one of the world's foremost authorities on acoustics and head of Munro Acoustics, a company specialising in the design of high-end music, film and broadcast studio facilities.

A member of the Institute of Acoustics, Mr Munro's clients include the BBC and many of the world's famous opera houses and auditoria. The meeting with John Stuart Reid, research director of Sonic Age America LLC and Sonic Age Ltd (UK) was historically significant, representing the first time that the CymaScope instrument has been demonstrated to an acoustics consultant. The cymascopic principle was demonstrated in relation to several applications including rendering visible the Mereon pattern, which may prove to be the energetic pattern that resides at the heart of Creation.

The discussion centred on the holographic nature of sound, which John Stuart Reid postulates infers that every atom and molecule in air carries all the data inherent in a given sound, no matter how complex. The quasi-3D aspects of cymascopic imagery were also discussed, a phenomena involving sub-surface sonically-induced effects.

Mr Munro commented, "As someone who is committed to discovering why sound consistently evades more detailed analysis than current practice, I was curious to see the CymaScope operating. When I saw the highly detailed sonically-induced patterns appearing before my eyes through the visual capture of standing waves in water, I realised that a daunting task lies ahead in de-mystifying such complexity and I look forward to learning more about this exciting research.''





21st May 2014

CymaScope imagery chosen for major ecological hotel project

The CymaScope team was approached by, designers of the Amma Center in Mexico, a ground-breaking project that will house hotel guests in ecologically designed pods.

Believed to be the first hotel of its kind in the world, the design is based on 22 adobe-constructed pods, each incorporating many ecological design features. The feature for which the designers asked for the assistance of was the requirement for each of the 22 pods to relate to a specific chakra of the body. To achieve this we captured a set of 22 CymaGlyphs based on musical notes in 432 tuning.

We also carried out research to support other associated design elements of the pods, incorporating color,
fragrance, crystals, astrological signs and several other aspects associated with each of the 22 chakras.
The resulting CymaGlyphs contain a unique set of beautiful geometries, used by the hotel designers in their choice of textiles and textures for wall and floor finishes and for fabric designs, unique to each pod.

More information can be found at:



18th March 2014

Karmin 'Pulses' pop video features the CymaScope

The CymaScope team have worked with Karmin, the pop duo team comprising Amy Heidemann and Nick Noonan who are enjoying growing success in many parts of the world with their unique brand of pop music.

Their Pulses video features a five note sung sequence and a seven word sung sequence, made visible on the CymaScope. We are delighted that Karmin decided to add a humorous introduction to the Pulses video, with George Takei (Star Trek helmsman character, Sulu) providing the voice over. George's fun explanation provides the basis by which the viewer can fully appreciate the CymaScope imagery within the Karmin video.

Both sequences show that it is possible for complex, fast-moving sounds to be transcribed to a visual analog, paving the way for MusicMadeVisible full length videos in the future. In addition to entertainment applications the new technique holds promise for the science of phonology since all the major nuances in speech can now be captured and rendered visible for study.

 There may also be benefits for profoundly deaf people since complex music can now be transcribed to a visual analog.

The video can be viewed on YouTube here:




Amy Heidemann and Nick Noonan


January 14th 2014

The world's first sounds of a snail eating, made visible on CymaScope

For the first time, the sounds of a Mesodon zaletus snail, eating carrot, have been successfully imaged on the CymaScope. The snail rasping sounds were recorded by Malacologist, Marla L. Coppolino, assisted by sound engineer, Lang Elliott, and  contain a variety of sonic 'plop' events as pieces of carrot were torn off by the snail's radula, its tongue-like protuberance. Surprisingly, some of the plop sounds contain structure, making it possible for the periodic geometry within the sounds to be captured on the CymaScope instrument.

CymaScope team member, John Stuart Reid, commented "When the snail makes sounds by eating crunchy food, the sonic energy radiates away spherically. The sounds then reflect off the inside of the snail's mouth and these surfaces modify the sonic periodicities, in much the same way that the sound of a hand clap is modified by the walls of a canyon. In the case of the snail, the reflective surfaces of its radula and mouth add another level of data to the snail's eating sounds."

Reid hypothesizes that these modified sounds could be thought of as being quasi-holographic in nature, that is, they may contain embedded spatial data relating to the surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the snail's radula. He suggests the possibility that some of the images contain structures representing parts of the snail's radula and mouth cavity. It is hoped that further research will shed more light on this hypothesis which, if demonstrated to be correct, will add to a growing body of evidence that sound has quasi-holographic properties.
Marla Coppolino commented, ''Snail morphologies contain some of the inherent geometries of Nature, something that has been of interest to me for decades. To have the snail rasping sounds made visible with a CymaScope supports the notion that some animals don't need to vocalize in order to make sounds from which vibrational data can be obtained.''

A video of the snail's sounds made visible can be seen in our 'Videos' section:






Mesadon zaletus snail

A video of the snail’s sounds made visible can be seen in our ‘Videos' section:


December 11th 2013

A wonderful new documentary, ''The Grounded'', by Kroschel Films, features the CymaScope.

The film is to be premiered in New York on January 10th and is an exposition of what some authorities consider to be the greatest health re-discovery of all time - grounding people to earth which has the effect of neutralising free radicals in the body and improving sleep and health.

The film maker, Steve Kroschel, filmed a sequence of Schumann Cavity Resonance in the laboratory of, the first time it has been captured on 35 mm film stock.

The trailer for the movie can be viewed here:



Visit to Prague Filmharmonic Orchestra for recording of the Grounded score.
Left to right: Composer: Stuart Mitchell, filmmaker: Steve Kroschell,
CymaScope representation: Annaliese and John Stuart Reid



November 11th 2013

Halo Drum imaged for first time on CymaScope

In collaboration with musician, Matthew Calder, we imaged a short Halo Drum melody as part of our ongoing development of MusicMadeVisible in which the complex harmonic structures within music are made visible in real time video mode. A Halo Drum is an instrument similar to a Hang Drum and the results of the
experiment can be seen in our Musicology section:

The Hang Drum was invented in 2001 by the Swiss company, Panart. Matthew told us: "I first came across the Hang Drum in 2002 and immediately fell in love with its unique sonics and musical range. As a percussionist the initial temptation was to play it like a drum, but it soon became clear that the harmonics and subtleties of the Hang  leant to a much more meditative expression of playing. More recently I have been playing a newer instrument by Pantheon Steel, the 'Halo'. Although it shares a similar form to the Hang Drum it is larger and has a very different character.

The Halo has a smoky, darker timbre with considerably greater projection. It also has more sustain, so its harmonics can be more readily captured on the CymaScope. The way the individual notes resonate creates a truly captivating sound. It is a great pleasure to see the Halo imaged on the Cymascope and to be part of a 'musical first.'

The clarity of the video imaging is superb and looking through the frames one by one, the way they flow into each other is fascinating."


Halo Drum, C3 note, still moment from the CymaScope video



August 22nd 2013

CymaScopic discoveries at the Mereon Conference

The 2015 Mereon Conference took place in August at the UK laboratory of, in a research-oriented cooperative venture with The Mereon Institute and its Lambda Lab research arm. The agenda of the conference included, deepening relationships between team members, conducting key experiments in the laboratory and defining additional research projects.

One of the most exciting moments, considered to be 'Mereonic-Cymatic history', occurred when a cymatic event was seen beneath the water's surface that had been predicted. Lynnclaire Dennis, on the far right of the photograph, commented:

"The astonishment we saw on Dr Louis Kauffman's face said it all as three camera angles into the CymaScope Visualising Cell provided a glimpse of a phenomenon that has been 'articulated' and 'anticipated' for 28 years. It only became observable when the Mereon Prime Frequency was captured at 45 and 90 degree angles. Furthermore, shooting from multiple angles provided clear evidence that now reinforces our hypothesis that the Mereon Prime Frequency is tying cymatic knots. The ability to see below the surface reveals that the CymaScope data is indeed, 3D."

The Mereon team is currently writing a paper to present this important evidence.







John Stuart Reid and The Mereon team



May 26th 2013

Cymatics featured on Discovery Channel

The Discovery Channel in the USA and Channel 5 in the UK, recently aired a documentary titled "The Da Vinci Code: The True Story", in which the truth behind Dan Brown's novel is revealed. Aspects of the chapel were featured in Dan Brown's novel, The Da Vinci Code.

The documentary features, among other items, the famous Rosslyn Cubes, a series of 213 carved cuboids that decorate the Lady Chapel in Edinburgh's famous Rosslyn Chapel. Each cube carries a cymatic pattern in raised relief; many people over the last few decades have attempted to decode the patterns to reveal what was thought to be music, each cymatic pattern representing a musical note.

No one had succeeded until father and son team, Thomas and Stuart Mitchell, focussed their considerable musical talents on the challenge. The secret of the cubes was indeed musical and the music that they decoded has been named the Rosslyn Motet.

The film maker asked if we could confirm Stuart and Thomas' musical code, on-camera. Using an electromechanical Chladni plate we were able to find patterns that strongly resembled the patterns-versus-frequencies discovered by the Mitchells.

This exciting development has showcased cymatics to millions of viewers and is sure to help popularize cymatics as an emergent science.

The patterns we confirmed can be seen on Thomas Mitchell's web site:

The Rosslyn Motet music is available for download here:


The full "The Da Vinci Code: The True Story" documentary is available to view on YouTube:





The 'Stave Angel' points to musical notes.
One of the cymatic cubes is seen above his head

The same cymatic pattern created by stroking the bow gently at one corner of the CymaPlate

John Stuart Reid examines a scale model of a Rosslyn Cube, carved in sand stone, courtesy of Rosslyn Chapel. The cuboids are surprisingly small!



May 2013

Cymatics at the San Francisco Exploratorium

When the team at was contacted by Karly Sue Smith of the Bay Area Artists, we were immediately taken by the name of the opening event planned for the New Exporatorium: The Seeds of LIfe. This title is particularly resonant with the CymaScope team because our work has repeatedly shown that the creation of life on earth seems to have been intimately connected with sound. When we see what appear to be living, dynamic forms in sonically imprinted water, when in fact the forms are merely life-like in their dynamism and shape, leads us to believe that sound may have been the very seed of life in the primordial oceans.

We were delighted to support the new Exploratorium's Gala event and hope that one day children and adults will be able to see such dynamic, cymascopic seeds of life in an Exploratorium exhibit.

Here's what the Exploratorium say about their centre:

"The Exploratorium is a twenty-first-century learning laboratory, an eye-opening, always-changing, playful place to explore and tinker. For more than forty years, we've built creative, thought-provoking exhibits, tools, programs, and experiences that ignite curiosity, encourage exploration, and lead to profound learning. Dive in and discover what we're all about."









March 3rd 2013

Cymatics comes of age as an emergent science:

The Mereon Matrix

In recent years, our research at has focused mainly on developing the CymaScope as a scientific instrument, to bring it to the point where it can accurately render and replicate sonic frequencies. However, we have remained aware that the governing dynamics of cymatic phenomena must be mathematically described for it to be fully embraced by mainstream science.

In 2012 we began working with the team of mathematicians and scientists who, after discovering what may be the energetic pattern that resides at the heart of Creation, have spent almost two decades investigating and researching its application. The anecdotal perspective of this discovery was first presented in the book ''The Pattern'' in 1997: the Pattern is now known as 'Mereon'. In our first dialogue with the Mereon team we were asked if the CymaScope could render visible some of the key frequencies related to this pattern. No one could have predicted just how successful the results of this collaboration would turn out.

To read the full story please visit our Mereon Matrix section:





Story posted: January 2013

Voice Mandala Image displayed at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK.

The Voice and the Lens exhibition was held at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, during November 2012 and was a festival and exhibition exploring the treasures of the human voice. Photographer, Kathryn Faulkner, was invited by curator, Sam Belinfante and Third Ear Music Production, to present a voice-related image. She chose a large-scale Voice Mandala print, imaged on the CymaScope by John Stuart Reid from a recording of her voice in which she chanted OM.

Kathryn is seen here standing beside her Voice Mandala, which contains beautiful six-fold geometry.




November 28th 2012

CymaScope chosen for major motion picture documentary

In October 2012 our UK CymaScope lab was visited by Kroschel Films regarding a major motion picture documentary nominally titled The Grounded. The movie, which will be released worldwide during 2015, covers the new science of 'grounding' or 'earthing.' The health benefits of walking bare foot, or being grounded by placing your feet on an electrically grounded mat while working at your computer or watching TV, are explored in depth in the movie.

The movie's co-producer, Steve Kroschel, shot 35 millimetre film footage of the CymaScope in action, using an Arriflex camera. While Hans Jenny shot cymatics in 16 millimetre film in the 1960's, this is the first time ever, to our knowledge, that cymatics has been shot in 35 millimetre. The results are expected to be spectacular on movie screens. One of the sequences shot was of Schumann cavity resonance, another first for the science of cymatics.

The release date of The Grounded will be posted in this section of our site when it is confirmed.




John Stuart Reid (right) shakes hands with film maker Steve Kroschel in the CymaScope lab


July 14th 2012

Cymatics at the Smithsonian

A few months ago we were asked by the Smithsonian to image some 'songs of the stars' for their new African Cosmos Stellar Arts exhibition which opened on June 20th and runs through to December 9th 2012.

The atomic processes within stars create sounds deep within the star, causing the starlight to vary minutely. These tiny modulations can be detected and demodulated, recreating the original sounds in the laboratory.

The star sounds were processed by three Universities and the completed sound files were then fed into a CymaScope, rendering the sounds visible.

The full story is in our Astrophysics section:






June 2nd 2012

Discovery News Highlights the CymaScope

In a Discovery News story by science writer, Jennifer Viegas, the work of John Stuart Reid and Jack Kassewitz is highlighted regarding dolphin language, along with the work of Peter Madsen, a researcher with the Department of Biological Sciences at Aarhus University.

Peter Masden's work suggests that dolphins create sounds by a process that is similar to the way humans make sounds with vocal cords. Reid said "Whichever way the dolphin generates sound, our work with the CymaScope instrument shows that dolphins communicate with sound pictures rather than words per se."

The full Discovery News story can be read here:





November 2nd 2011

We Are Not Alone--The Discovery of Dolphin Language

Jack Kassewitz of and John Stuart Reid of have made a significant breakthrough in deciphering dolphin language in which a series of eight objects have been sonically identified by dolphins.

When Reid imaged the dolphin's reflected echolocation sounds on the CymaScope it became possible for the first time to see the sono-pictorial images that the dolphin created. The resulting pictures resemble typical ultrasound images seen in hospitals. The team are calling the technique "Bio-Cymatic Imaging" a milestone in marine biology and acoustic physics.

You can read the full story in our Oceanography section:




Jack Kassewitz of



July 15th 2011

Japanese Children's Magazine Features the CymaScope

We were delighted to be invited to contribute the Japanese science magazine, "Otona no Kagaku" (Grown-up's Science) published by Gakken Holdings. Their latest edition is called "Otona no Kagaku with KIDS", a magazine that parents and children can enjoy and learn about science together:

The magazine was especially interested in the CymaScope's ability to make visible the sounds of piano notes. The graphic they prepared presents this concept wonderfully.

Click the graphic for a full size version.

You can see the video versions of these piano notes in our musicology section.





June 24th 2011

Royal "Harmonic Voice Mandalas" made visible for the first time on the CymaScope instrument

When Prince William and Kate Middleton spoke their wedding vows before 2 billion people, they couldn't have known that deep in the English Lake District, a laboratory was making their voices visible with a CymaScope.

Just as the invention of the microscope uncovered a previously hidden realm, the invention of the CymaScope reveals the once invisible realm of sound. The voice patterns of Prince William and Kate Middleton, now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, present some surprising results.

According to John Stuart Reid, the instrument's co-inventor, Prince William's voice has some interesting characteristics. "His Royal Highness' voice pattern is based on the number twelve that was a sacred number for many religions, including the royal Egyptian dynasties. The twelve plant-like motifs around the Duke's voice image resemble the lotus blossom, while the central feature, based on a hexagon, is very crown like. A sun or star-like symbol inside the hexagon reminds us that the sacred biography of all kings was related to the sun god."

And what of the Duchess' voice pattern? Again, Reid provides some interesting insights, "Her Royal Highness' voice pattern contains 14 flower-like motifs, and ancient symbology suggests that the number 14 denotes someone with a vivid imagination, who is full of ideas, energy and vitality. The inner part of the pattern includes a seven-sided figure, a number associated with the seven virtues: Faith, Hope, Charity, Fortitude, Justice, Prudence, and Temperance. "

One particularly wonderful aspect of the CymaScope is that it allows all sounds and voice patterns to be visually studied. Voice patterns are unique to each person, much like a finger-print. Sounds do not create 'waves', as is popularly believed, but shimmering, holographic sound bubbles, and the geometries contained within these bubbles are captured with this new instrument. As Prince William and Kate Middleton recited their marriage vows, the "sound bubbles" that emerged from their mouths were imaged on the CymaScope.

Sonic Age America is currently using the CymaScope to help decipher dolphin language with a team led by Jack Kassewitz in Florida, a dedicated marine biology researcher who has made significant strides in his bid to "speak dolphin." (See our Oceanography section.)





Copies of William & Kate's "Harmonic Love Mandala" artwork, featuring the merged voice patterns of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are available from Kassewitz's charitable organization, Global Heart Inc. All revenues from the artwork will go toward dolphin language research.

Please visit:



April 9th 2011

Popular female singer has become the first woman in Japan to see her own voice

Izumi Watanabe, the popular Japanese vocalist, ordered a large number of Harmonic Voice Mandalas just prior to the major earthquake that rocked Japan. Here is what Izumi wrote us after the devastation.

"We are safe, we live near Tokyo and the earthquake shook in our place greatly. It was scary...we sing love, light and sound to the earth. We sing love light and sound to the stricken area.
With a crystal singing ball I heard a cry of the earth at time of the earthquake. Her intention is strong. The consciousness of people must change.

My family have sent supplies to the stricken area. We help and encourage each other. We cooperate. We are all are the families of the earth!

I am you. You are me. We are one. We are light. We are sound. We are love."

Izumi hopes that the beauty of the mandalas, when seen by the Japanese
people, will help to lift their spirits. We hope so too.

Our Harmonic Voice Mandala section may be found here:



January 18th 2011

Artist chooses CymaScope to help crystalize a dream from teenage years

In 2006 the celebrated American artist, Ray Pierotti, attended the first international conference based on the sound healing modality, Cymatherapy. One of the guest speakers, John Stuart Reid, demonstrated the Cymascope, an instrument he developed with gifted American design engineer, Erik Larson.

Reid's talk and demonstration inspired Mr Pierotti to manifest a concept he first dreamed about as a teenager in the Wasatch Mountains, the creation of art that is able to capture and connect the ephemeral world of sight, shape, and sound.

To read the full story click here




Ray Pierotti


10th December 2010

Veritas Magazine carries superb new article on Cymatics

The December edition of Veritas Magazine, now in its third issue, carries a major 6-page article on cymatics. Authored by John Stuart Reid & Annaliese Shanda Reid the article is aimed at readers who have not previously been exposed to the subject of visible sound.

John Stuart commented: "Veritas invited us to write an article that would truly capture the imagination of readers and encourage them to explore the wonderful new field of cymatics for themselves. I hope we have achieved that goal and that readers will enjoy reading our overview of cymatics as much as Annaliese and I enjoyed writing it."

Download the article free:

Visit the Veritas web site here:




10th December   2010
Israeli construction company BST choose CymaScope for promotional ad campaign

The Israeli development & construction company, BST, have chosen to use a series of CymaGlyphs to support their latest promotional campaign. 

Daphna Oron, Art director of advertising agency Elfasi-Contact, said: "We needed a symbol of harmony and preciseness to represent the vision of BST Group. Your cymatics images are clearly the best in the world and if a picture speaks a thousand words your images speak volumes about beauty and precision, perfectly encapsulating two aspects of our client's professional ethos." BST's subsidiary, Marble Arch Trade, markets quality marble worldwide to the US, Canada, UK, Australia and Panama.

The BST Group web site can be found at:


10th October 2010

National Geographic "Amazing!" series features the CymaScope

National Geographic featured the CymaScope this summer in an episode of their AMAZING! show, which was aired in the U.S.A on August 27th. The film was shot at our UK CymaScope laboratory and John Stuart Reid provided the demonstrations,
including playing a Chladni plate outdoors in the first snows of winter, during which sand was filmed at macro range, dancing in the freezing air.

John commented "It is a wonderful acknowledgement of our work to be featured by National Geographic, particularly regarding the imaging of whale and dolphin sounds
and making the sounds from stars visible."

During the National Geographic film shoot John took this shot of Annaliese Reid creating Crystal 'CymaArt' in which sounds from the sun are being depicted by crystal media on glass.



National Geographic Amazing! documentary film team,
Tony & Dave, capturing live cymatic footage in the UK
laboratory of



September 2nd 2010

Piano notes made visible for the first time

Sonic Age America were commissioned by New Zealand-born artist, Shannon Novak, to make visible 12 notes from a grand piano. The notes, imaged in real time video, will be used by Mr Novak as inspiration for 12 fine-art works.

Previously it had been assumed that each note would have a fixed geometry but we discovered something surprising, the geometry actually varies over time as the note decays.

To read the full story click here



Shannon Novak




June 21st, 2010

Important step in our understanding of vowel sound structure

Previously it had been assumed that each of the five vowels would have the same basic form for every person. However, our present cymatic study of vocal sounds has revealed a surprising result. The geometry of vowels actually
varies from pitch-to-pitch for each person and from person to person. Nature, it seems, loves variety.

To read the full story click the link:




May 9th, 2010

The Song of the Stars Made Visible

The CymaScope has made visible, for the first time, the sound of a star, HR 3831A, a companion to HR 3831-B. First discovered by Professor Don Kurtz, currently of the University of Central Lancashire Centre for Astrophysics, UK, this is a rapidly oscillating star, known as an roAp* star.

It has an interesting acoustic signature that manifests beautifully on the CymaScope. It features distinctive geometry that could provide a useful analog for future students of asteroseismology and for outreach projects.

The sound file was generated by Zoltan Kollath.

Click on the star to watch the short video.





April 9th, 2010

Erik Larson, co inventor of the CymaScope, presents at NASA event

In honor of Yuri Gagarin, the first person to make a flight into space in 1961, NASA holds an annual "Yuri's Night" celebration at Moffett Federal Airfield near the south end of San Francisco Bay. This year featured the CymaScope, the world's first instrument that can make sound visible.

On Education Day, April 9th, 2010, Erik Larson and colleague, Alex Theory, presented an entertaining talk entitled "Discover Sound" to local school children and NASA scientists. The "Science CymaScope" was featured, using sand as the disclosing medium, along with a working prototype of "CymaScopeH20," the new entry-level model that uses water as the disclosing medium, due for product release later this year.

Erik and Alex demonstrated both CymaScope models to thousands of people over the weekend and many visitors said that their booth was the best of all the booths at the show.


April 11th, 2010

'Grooovenik' are world's first band to 'see' their music

A band from the North East of England, Groovenik, have become the first in the world to have some of their music imaged on the CymaScope. The story was published in the Sunday Sun newspaper on 11th April.